Conditions & Services

Conditions We Cover

Asthma

When you are diagnosed with asthma, it is important to understand changes in your condition so that your illness can remain under control. Your physician may create an asthma management plan that includes identifying your asthma triggers, keeping a record of your symptoms, and recording when you needed to use your rescue medication. Your physician may also direct you to monitor your “peak flow rate.” This is measured with a special meter that can help indicate if your asthma is worsening, even before you feel additional symptoms. Careful management also helps your physician to adjust your medication for better management of your symptoms to avoid or reduce the use of rescue medications.

Risk Factors:

  • Family history of Asthma
  • An allergic condition such as hay fever
  • Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke
  • Exposure to air pollution (smog)
  • Exposure to home cleaning products and other chemicals

Associated Conditions:

  • Allergies
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease)

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Anticoagulation (PT-INR Testing)

Improper blood clotting can produce many serious health problems including stroke, heart attack, pulmonary embolism, and deep vein thrombosis. Physicians may choose to address these by prescribing home self-testing for qualified patients. Advances in testing technology have made home self-testing possible, freeing patients from the need to travel to a professional facility to be tested when following Coumadin/warfarin medication regimens. Now, regular home testing can create the ongoing records to document changes in clotting times, allowing the physician to respond with appropriate medication and/or dietary changes.

Risk Factors:

  • Family or personal history of blood clots
  • History of the autoimmune disease antiphospholipid antibody syndrome
  • History of the autoimmune disease lupus
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle
  • High cholesterol

Associated Conditions:

  • Certain types of cancer
  • Autoimmune diseases such as lupus or antiphospholipid antibody syndrome
  • Post-operative states
  • Circumstances causing a prolonged period of inactivity

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Atrial Fibrilation

Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heartbeat that is fast and irregular. It may present no apparent symptoms, but this condition can cause palpitations, fainting, chest pain, or congestive heart failure. There are a variety of causes of “A-fib” including coronary artery disease, hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and heart valve disease. People diagnosed with A-fib are likely to be prescribed medication to help manage their condition. It is important that they monitor themselves regularly to control symptoms and to reduce the chance of stroke resulting from a blood clot traveling to the brain. Home monitoring devices are available and may include heart rate monitors that detect electrical signals from the heart (allowing the physician to observe any abnormalities), blood pressure monitors (which will detect spikes in your blood pressure), and anticoagulation meters (PT/INR testing) for people who are on blood thinners and need to control blood clotting. Home monitoring enables the physician to detect cardiac arrhythmias and blood clotting conditions sooner rather than later.

Risk Factors:

  • High blood pressure
  • History of heart attacks
  • Congenital heart defects
  • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland)
  • Lung disease such as COPD
  • Sleep apnea
  • Use of stimulants such as caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, or prescription medication

Associated Conditions:

  • Heart valve disease
  • Chronic lung disease such as COPD
  • Blood clot in the lungs (pulmonary embolism)
  • Blocked arteries in the heart (coronary artery disease)
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart failure

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Blood Cholesterol

High cholesterol is the cause of atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque in the arteries over time. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, and other substances that bond together and block the arteries. Atherosclerosis can lead to heart attack and stroke. Monitoring your cholesterol helps give the physician insights about patient diet and the effectiveness of any prescribed medication used to manage high cholesterol. With more information, the physician can better manage your risk factors for heart disease, heart attack, or stroke.

Risk Factors:

  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • High blood pressure
  • Diet that is high in fat and red meat
  • Sedentary or inactive lifestyle
  • Diabetes
  • Family history of heart disease

Associated Conditions:

  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Peripheral vascular disease

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Blood Pressure

Patients experiencing high blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes, or kidney disease may be instructed to monitor their blood pressure between medical appointments. Monitoring at home and keeping a record of daily changes in the testing results provide insight and reference points for medical personnel during office visits. When medications are involved in treatment, testing results can confirm the effectiveness of the prescribed plan of care. Home monitoring may also serve to distinguish variations in results between office testing and home testing, which might be attributable to stress, anxiety, or fatigue.

“Hypertension” is used to describe continually high blood pressure levels, and is called the “silent killer” because it is often symptomless. Blood pressure monitoring is the best way to determine a patient’s risk for this condition. Organ damage, stroke, vision difficulty, blindness, congestive heart failure, hardening of the arteries, and kidney disease have all been linked to hypertension.

Risk Factors:

  • Being overweight
  • Sedentary or inactive lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • Race (higher risk in African Americans)
  • Age (risks can increase with age)
  • Family history
  • Stress
  • Chronic conditions such as kidney disease and sleep apnea

Associated Conditions:

  • Heart disease
  • Aneurysm
  • Heart failure
  • Stroke
  • Dementia
  • Kidney failure
  • Eye damage
  • Erectile dysfunction

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Body Mass Index/Weight

It is helpful to monitor the relationship between weight and height (body mass index) because knowing how the BMI changes can alert the physician to health risks for diseases associated with being overweight or obese. Some of the diseases or conditions caused by being overweight or obese are: hypertension (high blood pressure), high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes, stroke, osteoarthritis, and respiratory problems like sleep apnea. If a person already has any of these conditions, monitoring their weight and BMI are ways to confirm they are on track with their weight management program.

Risk Factors:

  • Family history
  • Poor diet that is high in fat
  • Sedentary or inactive lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • Certain prescription medications
  • Pregnancy

Associated Conditions:

  • High blood pressure
  • Being overweight
  • High cholesterol
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Sleep apnea

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

COPD

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) is a common lung disease that makes it difficult to breathe normally. The two main forms of the condition are emphysema, which destroys the lungs over time, and chronic bronchitis, which is a long-term, mucus-producing cough. Persons with COPD may experience shortness of breath, a cough with or without mucus, fatigue and wheezing, and may be prone to many respiratory infections. Complications of COPD include irregular heartbeat, heart failure, pneumonia, the need for oxygen therapy, severe weight loss, and bone thinning (osteoporosis). If you have been diagnosed with COPD, your physician may want you to monitor your condition at home with the aid of a spirometer. A spirometer is a device that tests lung function by measuring lung capacity (by blowing into the device as hard as possible). It is a very simple test and easy to use at home. Your physician may ask you to keep a record of your symptoms and spirometry measurements to help manage your disease and reduce the chance of complications that may require you to be hospitalized. If your lung capacity is diminishing, regularly reporting testing results will help your physician to detect early infection or flare-ups and may prescribe medication or oxygen as needed.

Risk Factors:

  • Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke
  • Age
  • Exposure to certain chemicals and air pollution (smog)

Associated Conditions:

  • Cor pulmonale (an enlarged pulmonary artery)
  • Pneumonia
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Lung cancer
  • GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease)
  • Heart disease

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Depression

Clinical depression is a persistent mood disorder that interferes with everyday life over a long period of time. People who have clinical depression often have feelings of sadness, anger, loss or frustration. Symptoms may include “a bad mood,” irritability, feelings of self-loathing, guilt, hopelessness, fatigue, lack of appetite, weight change, difficulty concentrating, and thoughts of death or suicide. Depression can be treated with prescription medication and talk therapy. A physician may want to keep track of patient symptoms in order to determine the effectiveness of medication, discover any side effects, and help patients participate in their treatment and recovery. Physicians may ask patients to keep a log or journal that includes a record of medications, any side effects that may be noticed, and a record of how this patient is “feeling” each day to identify positive as well as negative behaviors and experiences. If you (or even someone you may know) find that you have thoughts of harming yourself or others, it is urgent that you seek assistance immediately by calling 911, contacting a suicide hotline, or going to the nearest emergency room.

Risk Factors:

  • Family history
  • History of chronic mental or physical disorders
  • Stress
  • Major life changes or events
  • Lack of support
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Sleep disorders

Diabetes (Glucose Testing)

Managing diabetes with regular glucose testing determines whether a person’s blood sugar is close to normal. Maintaining a healthy glucose level reduces infections, reduces the sense of thirstiness, and provides more energy. It is also key to avoiding more serious health conditions. By maintaining a healthy glucose level, one may decrease the chance for stroke and heart attack as well as other problems that can lead to kidney failure. Patients may also lessen the chance of developing diabetic neuropathy, which causes painful nerve damage or tingling and numbness in their hands and feet.

Risk Factors:

  • Family history
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Ethnicity (more common among African Americans, Latino/Hispanic Americans, Pacific Islanders and natives of Alaska)
  • History of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy)
  • Sedentary or inactive lifestyle
  • Age

Associated Conditions:

  • Bacterial and fungal infections of the skin
  • Itchy skin
  • Neuropathy or nerve damage that may cause pain
  • Eye problems like glaucoma or cataracts
  • Stroke
  • Kidney disease
  • High blood pressure

Associated Home Medical Equipment:

Stroke

A stroke, which is sometimes called a “brain attack”, occurs when an artery in the brain (or leading to the brain) becomes blocked by a blood clot, the blood flow to the brain is interrupted and brain cells begin to die. When brain cells die, brain damage occurs. Depending upon which area of the brain was involved, a stroke victim may experience loss of abilities such as speech, movement, memory, or vision. Strokes, and the damage that they cause, vary in severity. There are several types of stroke, but the most common is an ischemic stroke, which accounts for more than 87% of all strokes. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in America and most are preventable! It is very important to know the early warning signs of stroke.

If you suspect that someone is having a stroke act “FAST”:
F- FACE: Ask the person to smile…does their face droop?
A- ARMS: Can the person raise both arms? Does one drift downward?
S-SPEECH: Ask the person to say something simple…is speech slurred?
T-TIME: If you observe ANY of these signs call 911 immediately!

Stroke symptoms may include sudden numbness of face, arms or one side of the body; sudden slurred speech or difficulty speaking; sudden dizziness or loss of balance; or sudden severe headache with no known cause. If a physician believes that a patient is at risk of stroke, the patient may be asked to monitor their blood pressure at home, since high blood pressure is a major risk factor.

Risk Factors:

  • Family history
  • Age
  • Gender (women more than men)
  • Smoking
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • Alcohol and drug abuse

Associated Conditions:

  • Visual problems such as vision loss and eye movement problems
  • Balance and coordination issues – loss of, or impaired mobility
  • Memory problems
  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Speech impairment
  • Bowel and bladder problems
  • Swallowing problems

Services We Provide

Risk Evaluation Reports

Risk Evaluation Reports: Each time you record new testing results, you can click on the Risk Evaluation button to generate a report on your overall health. The report details each condition you manage, highlighting health-risk areas.

This allows your doctor to clinically record or chart your testing results, and can also assist them in deciding whether your care plan needs to be changed. With our Risk Evaluation Report attached to your test results, your physician can easily determine the seriousness of out-of-range testing results and provide the best response for your health.

Health Information: When you click on the Health Information button, you’ll receive information that corresponds to all of the potential conditions that MyPSTLog® helps you manage. It provides educational information that will help educate you regarding new or existing conditions.

Medication Log

By using the MyPSTLog® Medication Log, you and your physician can record your use of all medications and track their effectiveness. Prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and herbal products can all affect your health, so it’s important that your doctor be aware of what you’re taking, as well as any side effects you may be experiencing.

The Medication Log has numerous benefits:

  • It helps you remember how often to take your medications (as long as you keep the information up to date).
  • It’s especially helpful in an emergency when you may not remember—or be unable to tell medical personnel—what medications you’re taking.
  • Providing a complete record of your medications can assist your physician in identifying the source of any possible interactions between medications. Our Medication Log is tied to each condition you manage, so your doctor can review past and present dosing and make changes quickly when required.
  • When you start a new medication, the old medication is still retained in your history. This helps your physician to determine if previously prescribed medications along with new medication have any side effects.